Jul 3, 2015

Posted by in Gaming | 1 Comment

Character Study

My daughter has been hounding my wife and me to give her “commission work” to draw because other family members have offered to buy some of her artwork (not in a patronizing way), and because I talked to her about the commission circuit.

We gave her some instruction on what we wanted her to work on. For my wife, she wanted a picture of herself and her sister playing a board game. I asked for a picture of me playing a video game (duh). She works in the anime/chibi style, so I expected a cool picture I could use as my online avatar because having an in-house sweatshop to churn out art is what I need if I’m ever going to make headway with this game development shtick.

Thing is, she gave us a lot of crap about not “giving her a lot to work with”. She was expecting exacting detail, like clothing poses, facial expressions, and probably even minutiae like colors and patterns. I frowned at her, and told her that she’s kind of missing the point of “art”: it’s not about someone telling you what to make; it’s about something asking you to make something. We wanted her to apply creativity to the process, but she wanted the path of least resistance.

So I met her half-way. I want her to draw something, so I figured since I’m playing Guild Wars 2 ahead of the expansion, she could draw my Ranger. I took a bunch of screenshots from the front, sides, and top (the best I could do with the limited camera range in the game), and told her that she only needed to draw from the waist up. At the very least I expect it’ll be a good workout for her, but I’m more than half expecting her to basically just copy what I’ve given her. Ideally, I’d like her to take the face, hair, and clothing, and draw some kind of “not what’s in the screenshots” post, like an action pose or something.

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  1. I am really not trained on it, but that might work out really well. My brother is the big-time artist in our family and I think back to him and myself and recall us wanting realism (I.E. details) when we were younger, or something real to draw from – then we starting adding more abstract ideas or imagination later on.

    And, yeah, an in-house sweatshop is cool to have too. Utilize what you got! ;P

What do you think?