New PC: The Aftermath

New PC: The Aftermath

Posted by on Mar 20, 2017 in Gaming, Glamour Shots, Hardware, Software

New PC: The Aftermath

 

The “before” picture

I finally got around to building my new PC on Saturday morning. I woke up early (about 6:45 AM) in part because I’m getting old and old people eat dinner early and also wake up early, and because it was like gawddamned Christmas. I could tell that it had been quite some time since I’d last built a custom PC, because it took me hours for several reasons. First, the motherboard is a gaming motherboard, which means there’s a lot more gee-gaws on there in the event that the builder wants to overclock, side clock, cock-block, and rock around the clock. Second, the case I had bought was nicer than a sub-$100 case had any right to be, complete with a removable side panel that allowed me to route 98% of the cables out of sight to create the cleanest looking internal configuration I’ve ever had the pleasure to build. Third, I didn’t want to put an optical drive in there because everything is on the Internet now, except that for some reason this board’s integrated network port didn’t work at all without drivers…which were on the DVD that came with the motherboard. I had to open the side-panel, disconnect one of the HDDs and wire in a spare DVD to get the install media that would let me get the PC online.

NSFW

To say that I’m pleased with this PC is an understatement. It used to be that my PC was the loudest thing in the room, what with its aging cooling system ramping up the fans just because the day ended with the letter “Y”. Now, I can hear all kinds of other things from the corners of the basement (and I’m kind of worried about the state of my house as a result) because the fans are software controlled, and the water cooling system is whisper-quiet. Honestly, I still expect to hear the fans whine at certain points of operation and it takes me a second or two to realize why I’m not.

My biggest problem? Finding something that I have that will put the system through its paces. The system I was replacing wasn’t deadweight; it could still handle pretty much everything I’d thrown at it, but looking over the recommended requirements for Mass Effect: Andromeda made me realize that I was only a micron away from falling away from the trailing edge of what I’d be able to run very, very soon.

The first Big Test was probably the biggest game I have that would yield true results: Star Citizen. I had been able to run SC, but not all that well, with visual lag coupled with the motion blur that can’t be turned off resulting in a real headache for me. On the new system, though, SC ran like a real game. I was able to sprint through Port Olisar, jump into my Connie and take off. Moving through the ship was a breeze, and I was even able to get back into the ship when I accidentally shot myself out of the airlock without worrying about mistiming due to lag.

Not representative of temps, but the number of control panels this motherboard offers is staggering

As a consequence of picking up a GTX 1070 from Newegg, I scored a copy of Ghost Recon: Wildlands, a game I’d been cool on, but interested if I could play with others. This game ran exceedingly well and only notched the CPU up to about 68C/154F which from what I’m seeing is either average for an i7-7700K with water cooling, or is on the lower side. In light of that, then, the only issue I ran into thanks to testing with GR:W was with the fact that I’m still using physical platter HDs.

I have an SSD for my main OS drive, and I try very hard not to install anything there, and I have moved all of my high-access content to one of the physical drives (page file, Documents, Downloads, Videos, etc). Everything else is installed to one of these two 500GB physical drives: one specifically for games, and the other for everything else. When running GR:W, then, the only issues that cropped up occurred when the game needed to access data from the disk. It hitched and paused for a few seconds which for an RPG might be OK, but for a game requiring a smooth experience so as not to end up dead, this was nigh unacceptable. Defragging the HD (remember that?) helped, but it got me thinking about what’s called an M.2 SSD.

How retro!

On newer motherboards, there’s a slot for a device that looks like an old-school stick of RAM with its green board and exposed microchips. The port itself is generic, accepting anything from SSDs to wireless and Bluetooth cards. The benefit of an M.2 SSD is that its bus is supposedly faster than a conventional drive hookup (on my board, it’s a 6GB/sec SATA connection), but it’s also low-profile and requires no cables for connection or power supply.

So I’ve been considering adding an M.2. drive to this system, but it’ll have to wait because I’ve already spent as much as I’m able on this system at this time. Alternatively, I’m now in a place where I can consider whether or not to get on the VR bandwagon (or more accurately the much smaller VR Red Ryder wagon). I looked over what kinds of games on Steam require VR, and came away pretty unimpressed. I have Elite: Dangerous already, and while I know what a boon having head tracking is (thanks to having used TrackIR with the game), I’m not sure shelling out hundreds for a VR setup would be worthwhile just for Elite. Other promising items like Star Trek: Bridge Crew sound absolutely amazing on paper, but since I don’t know too many people who also have VR setups, I’d have to play with *shudder* the general population. Really, right now I’m thinking that I should shelve VR until V2.0 or if I’m hell bent on it for some reason, to look at lower cost versions like PSVR (which seems to have a better lineup than what I saw on Steam).